Boeing B-314

The Boeing clipper is widely regarded at the summit of flying boat technology.  It inaugurated the world’s first transatlantic  heavier-than-air service, and carried passengers and cargo around the globe in the 1930’s and 1940’s.

Large, luxurious, and reliable — and with an astounding range of 3,500 statute miles — the B-314 made intercontinental passenger airline service a practical reality.

314-138-laguardia

Boeing B-314 "Dixie Clipper" (click photos to enlarge)

The development of the B-314

Early in 1936, Pan American solicited proposals for the next generation airliner for Atlantic service, and to stimulate interest among aircraft manufacturers, Pan Am offered a $50,000 cash prize for the winning design.

Sikorsky responded with a design that would eventually be developed as the S-44, which met Pan Am’s requirements for speed and range but was rejected because it carried too few passengers.   (Three S-44’s would later be used by American Export Airlines, which competed with Pan Am across the Atlantic from 1945-1950.)   Consolidated Aircraft proposed a four-engine ship based on its PB-Y Catalina flying boat (which would later gain fame as an anti-submarine and search-and-rescue aircraft during World War II), but the Consolidated design was also rejected as too small.

Martin, which made the M-130 China Clipper, proposed a model known as the M-156, but it was also rejected by Pam Am, leaving Glenn Martin furious; despite owing much of its success to the China Clipper. Pan Am had purchased only three of the M-130 aircraft.  Martin had taken a loss on such a small production run, which he expected to make up with future business for the airline.

The winner of Pan Am’s competition was the Boeing Aircraft Company of Seattle, Washington, which was initially reluctant even to submit a proposal.  But under the leadership of a relatively young engineer named Wellwood Beall, Boeing eventually constructed a ship widely recognized as the apex of flying boat design.

On June 31, 1936, Pan Am signed a contract for six of the Boeing 314 clippers, with an option for six more.

Boeing B-314 Passenger Accommodations

The B-314 could carry 74 passengers and 10 crew, although in overnight sleeper configuration, the ship accommodated 40 passengers in seven luxurious compartments, including a 14-seat dining room and a private “honeymoon suite” at the tail end of the plane.

B-314. Life Magazine, August 23, 1937.

B-314. Life Magazine, August 23, 1937.

B-214 Passenger Deck Plan (click to enlarge)

B-214 Passenger Deck Plan (click to enlarge)

B-314 "Honeymoon Suite"

B-314 "Honeymoon Suite"

B-314 Dining Room and Lounge

B-314 Dining Room and Lounge

Boeing 314 Dining Room

Boeing 314 Dining Room

Boeing B-314 Technical Details

A giant aircraft for its day, the B-314 weighed over 40 tons and had a wingspan 3/4 that of a Boeing 747-100.

  • Length: 106′
  • Wingspan: 152′
  • Max Gross Takeoff Weight:  82,500 lb B-314, 84,000 lb B-314A
  • Engines: Four Wright GR-2600 Twin Cyclone, 14 cylinder radial engines (1,500 hp B-314, 1,600 hp B-314A)
  • Propellers: Hamilton-Standard 3-blade, full-feathering constant speed (variable pitch), 14′ diameter
  • Fuel capacity: 4,246 gallons B-314, 5,446 B-314A
  • Crew:  10
  • Maximum  Speed:  199 mph
  • Cruising Speed:  183 mph
  • Service Ceiling: 13,400 ft B-314, 19,600 ft B-314A
  • Range: 3,500 miles B-314, 5,200 miles B-314A
B-314 wing catwalk, allowing access to the engines during flight.

B-314 wing catwalk, allowing access to the engines during flight.

Among the technical innovations pioneered by the B-314 were the fully-feathering propellers insisted upon by Pan Am Chief Engineer Andre Priester.   And important safety feature which would be incorporated in virtually all subsequent variable-pitch propellers, the full-feathering props also allowed mechanics to take advantage of the B-314’s unparalleled in-flight engine access made possible by the wing’s thick chord.  The 314’s wing was thick enough to allow access through a walkway to the engines in flight, where the fully-feathering props made it possible for a mechanic to perform repairs in flight.  Between June, 1939 and June, 1941, 431 in-flight engine repairs were performed by B-314 engineers.

Over the course of their careers, the B-314’s operated by Pan American made approximately 5,000 ocean crossings and flew more than 12.5 million miles, and each of Pan Am’s Boeing clippers accumulated mor ethan 18,000 flight hours.  During World War II alone, B-314’s carried more than 84,000 passengers, almost all of whom were on journeys of importance to the war effort.

b-314-160-web
Pan Am Yankee Clipper
b-314-163-web
Postcard of Boeing 314 Flight Deck
b-314-flight-deck
Flight deck of Boeing 314

The Boeing Clippers

Operated by Pan American Airways (PAA)

Model B-314

  • NC-18601 – Honolulu Clipper
  • NC-18602 – California Clipper (renamed Pacific Clipper for a few months in 1941)
  • NC-18603 – Yankee Clipper
  • NC-18604 – Atlantic Clipper
  • NC-18605 – Dixie Clipper
  • NC-18606 – American Clipper

Model B-314A

  • NC-18609 – Pacific Clipper (renamed California Clipper for a few months in 1941)
  • NC-18611 – Anzac Clipper
  • NC-18612 – Cape Town Clipper

Operated by British Overseas Airways Corporation (BOAC)

Model B-314A

  • NC-18607/G-AGBZ – Bristol
  • NC-18608/G-AGCA – Berwick
  • NC-18610/G-AGCB – Bangor

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Sheer Awesome | Simple Tricks and Nonsense
January 23, 2014 at 1:53 pm

{ 83 comments… read them below or add one }

Michael Meek April 12, 2014 at 12:16 pm

I am seeking information on my deceased step-mother’s cousin, Scott Flower, who was a longtime pilot for Pan Am. Would any readers here have information?
Thanks,
MM

[Reply]

Ted Heal February 26, 2014 at 7:17 pm

Hi there, I log on to your blog on a regular basis.
Your story-telling style is awesome, keep up the good work!

[Reply]

Megan Jagger February 20, 2014 at 4:47 pm

Does anybody out here remember Lt Commander Patrick J Byrne aka Pappy ? He had a long history & a great love of the flying boats during his USN career. I have several pictures of the original Mars flying boats. I believe he also did quite a bit of transatlantic route plotting w PanAm.

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Sam Streubel August 6, 2013 at 11:07 pm

I see here that the service ceiling was 13,400 feet. But wasn’t the cruising altitude something like 1,500 – 1,800 feet?

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Anonymous August 2, 2013 at 9:45 am

Excellent notable analytical vision intended for fine detail and can anticipate complications before these people happen.

[Reply]

Elbert July 31, 2013 at 12:36 pm

Hello, its good piece of writing on the topic of
media print, we all understand media is a wonderful source of information.

[Reply]

Heidi Legg July 29, 2013 at 9:45 pm

Hi,
I am looking at how to use two of these photos in an online news article. Do you have the rights to publish them and can you grant them to me?

Fantastic photos!
Heidi

[Reply]

Chris June 9, 2013 at 8:59 pm

What a plane!!

I’ve always said that WHEN I win the lotto, I would figure out how to acquire one, refurbish it and fly the world!!!

Part One of my plan is still in the works ;-)

If none are available, I will build one from scratch. Take off from Colorado and simply drop anchor in Maui. Man, How fun would that be?!?!? ay???

[Reply]

Tracie May 22, 2013 at 6:50 pm

What is the best way to include limited college experience on
a resume?

[Reply]

Daniele April 16, 2013 at 7:50 pm

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I extremely enjoyed the usual info an individual
provide to your guests? Is going to be back regularly to inspect new posts

[Reply]

Maynard G. Foster March 10, 2013 at 12:57 pm

A Boeing B-314 clipper left Hawaii 11-3-1945 bound for California. It was piloted by Captain Frederick C. Richards. Does anybody know the given name of the clipper?

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James R. Hurd, Jr. Reply:

It was the Honolulu Clipper (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honolulu_Clipper)

Honolulu Clipper departed Hawaii on 3 November 1945 with an Operation Magic Carpet flight carrying 26 military personnel returning to the United States after service in the Pacific. The aircraft lost power in both starboard engines after five hours of flying, and successfully landed 650 miles east of Oahu shortly before midnight. The merchant tanker Englewood Hills maintained radio contact, found the aircraft and removed the passengers on the morning of 4 November. The escort carrier Manila Bay arrived and sent over aircraft mechanics who were unable to repair the engines at sea. Manila Bay then attempted to tow the aircraft; but the tow line parted as weather deteriorated. The seaplane tender San Pablo was assigned to tow the flying boat into port; but Honolulu Clipper was damaged in a collision with the tender on 7 November and intentionally sunk on 14 November by perforating the hull with 1200 20mm Oerlikon shells after salvage was deemed impractical.[1]

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Maynard Foster Reply:

Thank you for the reply. The Honolulu Clipper was piloted by Capt. S. E. Robbins. I am looking for the name of the clipper that was about 150 miles behind the Honolulu Clipper & was piloted by Capt. Fred C. Richards. My father was on the “following” clipper. My father is deceased, I am trying to put together a time line. Thank you.

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Jack smyer March 1, 2013 at 4:42 pm

I am looking for a large scale model of the B-314

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Peter Miles February 13, 2013 at 1:30 pm

Does anybody know of the whereabouts of an American Author, Tom Williams, who wrote about the 314. I think he resides in Florida.

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T.E.guillot January 5, 2013 at 2:06 pm

Does anyone recall the name of waffle hester who flew on the south American route out of Miami?

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Austin Jack Leftwich, Jr. Reply:

As a First Officer I flew with Captain Warfield Hester occasionally out of Miami from 1947 until 1954, DC-4 equipment to San Juan, PR, New York, via Bermuda, and return to San Juan
Warfield was a great guy, soft-spoken and most pleasant, contributing to the camaraderie at crew layover points. He owned a citrus farm in the Miami area. His life took a tragic turn at the accidental loss of their son while Miami-based. The tragedy affected him and his wife, Ginny, greatly.
My last contact with them was during an excursion to Sedona, AZ as part of the tour package associated with the Clipper Pioneer Convention held in Scottsdale, AZ. (Year…?)
Captain “Lefty” Leftwich, Pan Am, retired 1977

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Allen Taylor November 11, 2012 at 8:40 am

Flew with Pan Am for a short period from 1988 to the very last day in 1991. Great stories and great experiences with many pilots that saw a big part of Pan Am’s heyday. Pan Am pilot name Herb Cox taught me how to fly in the 60’s when he was New York based.

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Rin September 1, 2012 at 11:35 am

Is ther anyone that have any info about the Martin M-130 or Boeing B-314 regaring purchase or auctions or maby a “graveyard”

(u and contact me on s40driver@gmail.com if u prefer)

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Fred Hampe August 13, 2012 at 9:59 pm

My father, George Hampe (97yrs.) has 2 PAA Flying Clipper certificates (Equator Crossing & Inter. Date Line) dated Nov23-24, 1946 from Auckland, NZ to San Francisco looks like it is signed by “F.P. Glen” (hard to read). I’m trying to research the specific aircraft. My dad said it was the maiden voyage, I tend to think it was the final flight. He was stationed on Hawaii and may have flown out of Oahu. He also said there were only 5 passengers on board and the plane had stop-overs at 5 islands. He also remembers having 5 bottles of Johnnie Walker Red and a number of boxes of cigars lifted from his army trunk. He’s quickly losing memory and I sure would like to verify some of his stories.
Thanks

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Douglas Westfall July 10, 2012 at 6:15 pm

Does anyone know of the demise of the Pacific Clipper, B-314A – NC-18609, November of 1946? I know it was damaged and then salvaged for parts — but where and how?
Best Always, Douglas

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Russ Bloxsom July 10, 2012 at 9:07 am

In January 1942 the UKs Prime Minister Winston Churchill after a secret meeting with PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbour.. decided to fly home from Bermuda in a Boeing Clipper Flying Boat Berwick..A Luftwaffe squadron was scrambled as the flying boat passes over Brest in France..but fortunately for some reason they could not find it and Winston made it safely back to the UK…

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Roger DeBeers May 13, 2012 at 5:28 pm

I understand in 1941 the Clippers flew from the Targus River in Portugal to the Azores where they had to land in the open sea, which was difficult due to the weather, and then onto Bermuda. Anyone kown about this?

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G_Mendes Reply:

I know about this, they used the Horta harbour, Faial Island, Azores.
In those days, if the outside waters were in bad weather, the plane couldn’t takeoff. In one occasion there were three clippers stranded there for some days.
Landing was easier, as it used the part of the inside harbor waters.

They had there two support boats that were different from all the other used by Pan Am in their bases. One was a tug and the other a passenger boat. I’m researching about this subject, so any information about it is welcome.

[Reply]

Conceicao Andrade Reply:

Hi

Do you know anything about the clipper crash in Faial harbor, I believe in the 1950s (which I saw when I was a child).

Thanks

Conceicao

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AZAD A.H. March 25, 2012 at 8:42 am

I love the Boeing Clippers flying boat , it makes me dream.
Is there any poepe who could send me all pictures inside , outside,
of this airplane….I would like to learn a bit more about it.
Why they have stp the construction???? Is there any chance
to see one day a new concept of this flying boat one day???

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Marianne Reply:

Hi,
Just read the book by Ken Follett “night over water”, which tells the story of people flying from London to New York in this Pan Am Clipper. Gives you a good insight in how these flights went and how people lived aboard this plane for 36 hours.

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Sue Cooper Reply:

I’m just reading that particular book now, which is why i’m online looking for photos of this fabulous sounding aeroplane/boat! I wish there was still such a thing in existence to ride on nowadays!

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Neil Hobbs Reply:

I’ve just read the book as well & that is what bought me here!
Wasn’t aware of this trans-atlantic service before reading the book.

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D Semenoff Reply:

I too, just finished Ken Folletts book and I had never heard of these planes before – I had heard the name “Yankee Clipper” but didn’t know what it was before. and I was 3 years in the Navy.
Just fascinating, what an idea.
Great pictures on this website.

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Dianne March 19, 2012 at 10:10 am

While doing family history research came across a photo of three relatives standing on land pictured with the NC18603 (number visible on tail) in the water in the background. Written on the photo is “Test flight 74 Passenger American Clipper Baltimore Feb. 24, 1939″.
Checking it out I find this plane was actually the Yankee Clipper. Was indeed it tested in Baltimore on the above date? Thanks.

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Julia Badham March 12, 2012 at 4:29 pm

My father, Thomas Laughlin, was the navigator on the Honolulu, California and Dixie Clippers for Pan Am. He flew out of San Francisco and flew the Pacific eventually carrying troops to the South Pacific. He is in declining health, and I would love to find someone who might have flown with him as he has such warm memories of his many flights.

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Eben Reply:

My grandfather, who recently passed, was a Pan Am Captain and flew many different aircraft for Pan American, one of which was the B-314. His name was Elwin Roger Smart and he went by Roger. I can’t say which specific Clippers he flew, but we have more pictures of the Dixie than any other. He finished his career as a Captain of 747’s flying from New York to Scottland. If he was still alive I am sure he would have enjoyed sharing stories with a fellow pioneer of aviation.

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Stephen H. Goode Reply:

My dad, Lewis H. Goode, worked for Pan American Airways as a radio man aboard a Clipper Ship which made runs between San Francisco, CA to Hawaii. I have always been proud of his pioneer spirit. Dad was later inducted in the U. S. Navy during WW II and served aboard various “Liberty Ships” transporting ammo, bombs and other war materials to the South Pacific.

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Ed Dover Reply:

Hi Stephen,

I knew your dad, Lewis H. Goode. He and I were flying for Pan Am as flight radio officers at about the same time. Based in San Francisco, we flew under the wartime (WWII) contract with the Naval Air Transport Service (NATS). In addition to flying Pan Am’s Martin and Boeing Clippers we also flew the Navy Consolidated PB2Y3 and the Martin PBM flying boats on routes to the South Pacific Islands. I remember that Lewis was the flight radio officer on a Navy PB2Y3 that was making a night takeoff from the island of Funafuti. I do not recall the exact date but it would have been sometime in 1944 or 45. A local fisherman had anchored his boat in the middle of the seaplane channel and it did not have any lights. The PB2Y3 clipped the boat’s mast and crashed into the water. I believe there were several fatal casualties but your dad survived with some injuries. As best as I can recall, when he returned to San Francisco his injuries were severe enough to result in being removed from flight duty. It may have been this incident that led to his leaving Pan Am and going into the navy as a radio operator on surface ships. I lost track of him after he left Pan Am.

[Reply]

Cory Pfau Reply:

Hi Ed, My father flew from SF to Hawaii on the clippers. His name was Al Pfau. Just wondered if you knew him in those days.

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Ed Dover Reply:

Hi Cory,
While I do not recognize the name Al Pfau, it is possible that your father and I were flying as crew members with Pan Am at about the same time. We did not fly with the same crew members for each flight. The Pan Am crew scheduling office assigned crew members on a rotating basis and you were usually with a different group of flight crews for each flight. Unfortunately I did not keep any personal records of all the crews I flew with during those years in the Pacific (1943-1945). I recalled Lewis Goode because of his involvement with the accident at Funafuti which was big news at the time.

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Karl Selander Reply:

Hi Cory, I do not know if you would remember me. Your dad and I had a big part in the purchase of New Cuyama back in the early 70s. I was the administrator of F.A.R. ( Foundation for Airborne Relief in Long Beach and Al told us about the town and it being offered for sale.
Is your dad still alive?

Karl

[Reply]

Cory Pfau Reply:

Karl, I do remember you. I think my brother Jim and I did some work for you on the C-133s that were stored at Mojave. My wife Karen and I had my dad live with us for a few years in the 90s and then he moved to Holyoke Colorado with my brother. Dad passed away in 98. We have 5 boys, 2 we adopted as adults from Haiti to help them with their education. One named Al finish his degree in civil engineering and is working at PG&E as I am. The other will be going into the Army soon to get his citizenship and be a Med Tech. My dad would have loved these guys as he really loved our boys. My mother, Virgina died in 77 you may remember her.
I can’t remember for sure but did you come up to Alaska to visit one summer while we were there?

Karl Selander Reply:

Great to hear from you!! No, I did not visit you in Alaska but your Dad did invite me to fly up to his “Moose Farm”. He and I had a great relationship and I regard him and his memory as wonderful times of fellowship in the Lord.
I do remember your Mom and her gracious hospitality in the years I met with your Dad.
I am living in Dallas, TX helping my sister who is in a wheelchair. Her son, who works for BP in Russia, asked us to move into his house next door to Virginia, my sister.
I have pictures of the 133 flying over Long Beach and often remember that it was your Dad who put us onto the Cuyama property. He called me one day at my office in Long Beach and asked, “You want to buy a town?”. We werer in the middle of the airlift in Bangledesh and my answer was, that’s the last thing I would want with what is going on here. His answer was, “It has a 4,000 foot paved runway!” and my answer was, “You got my attention!” and the rest is all history. Everyone should have a friend like your Dad!!!!
My email is: atcoasales@sbcglobal.net Keep in touch- Karl

Al Robinson Reply:

Hi Julia and all,
I have a Nav. practice book that I think Pan Am did.. It has all of the preflight and prep for a simulated trip, KSFO to PHNL. The amout of work the Nav’s had to do was amazing but the watercolor sketches in it are outstanding.. all Pan Am flying boats.

Al

[Reply]

Walter Runck Reply:

Mr. Robinson,

I’m very interested in the Navigation practice book you mentioned. Is there some way you would be willing to share it?

Thanks,
Walter

[Reply]

Albert Robinson Reply:

What did you have in mind?

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Walter Reply:

Mr. Robinson,

I’ve been researching Amelia Earhart’s last flight and there is not a lot of information available about trans-Pacific aerial navigation documents of the period. Your training manual sounds like it may have material either similar to, used by or perhaps written by Fred Noonan, who was Earhart’s navigator and disappeared with her. In any case, it sounds like a beautiful document and I’d love to get a look at it.

If you could scan or otherwise share a copy of the manual it would be greatly appreciated. Who knows, you may even help solve a mystery.

Thanks,
Walter

[Reply]

Roger Baker March 3, 2012 at 2:50 pm

Boeing’s 314 had a similar range to the Martin 130 so I assume that when it crossed the Pacific it also used Midway Atoll, however, I cannot seem to confirm this. Can anyone tell me?

[Reply]

Julia Badham Reply:

My father was a navigator on these and flew the Pacific routes. I asked him your question yesterday, and his response was, yes, they did stop at Midway.

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Roger Baker Reply:

I am volunteering for the Fish and Wildlife Service doing graphics for Midway Atoll NWR and will include images of the Boeing 314 along with the Martin 130 for their possible use based on this information. Thank you very much.

[Reply]

Kim Reply:

There is a nice DVD that chronicles the Clipper and some of the footage includes the Pan Am facility on Midway. You can check it out via this link: http://www.flyingclippers.com/postflight/V0053.html

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Peter S. Carter March 1, 2012 at 8:21 pm

What happened if the seas were too rough for landing at the Clipper’s destination?

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Julia Badham Reply:

My father (a PanAm navigator on this aircraft), answers your question with the following: On one particular cargo flight from Honolulu to SF, they were unable to land due to dense fog. In these instances, they landed on the Sacramento River. The one he remembers most is landing on the river Xmas eve near a place called Rio Vista. They parked for a while waiting for the fog to lift, but it only got worse, keeping them overnight on the river. Still there in the morning, they taxied toward the bay and under the Continas Bridge the fog still so dense they actually couldn’t see the bridge. PanAm sent out a launch which came up the bay firing rockets to provide them with a direction. They taxied all the way to the airport. To this day he doesn’t know exactly how far they traveled through the fog.

[Reply]

Kim Reply:

Hi Julia,

Does your father remember the names of any of the Clipper pilots he flew with on the Pacific route? I have a former executive assistant whose dad was a Clipper pilot on that route.

Kim

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Julia Badham Reply:

I asked my dad your question today, and he could only remember one name, Ford, I don’t know if this is a first or last name. However, he told me where to find a photo that he remembered was signed. It is 11×14″ bw of one of the Clippers taken just as it lifts off from SF Bay. It is signed on the back by 62 crew members all of whom were crew on one of the Clippers. If you have a name, I can check it against this list.

Julia

[Reply]

Kim Reply:

I suspect your dad was referring to Capt. Robert Ford. Here is a link to a site that speaks of a story about him: http://www.longwayhome.com And the name of my former admin. asst. was Bob Grace.

Kim

[Reply]

Kim Reply:

Sorry, I didn’t make that clear – the name of the father of my former administrative assistant was Bob Grace, who flew the same route as your dad in ‘40 or ‘41, just before the war.

Kim

Julia Badham Reply:

Thanks for the link, I just ordered two books. I didn’t find the name you mentioned in this group. I suspect it is signed by the navigators for the most part. But don’t know, because they didn’t list their duty. My dad recognized a couple as navigators, but there weren’t that many of them. I have begun looking through the web at individual names, and find scant info as most of them are obituaries, sadly.

Julia

Kim Reply:

Thanks for checking with your dad. And MY memory is getting a little questionable as well – the name of my admin’s father was Bill Grace, not “Bob”. She gave me a replica of the certificate he received – as did all crew and passengers – when they crossed the International Dateline and it is signed by a Captain Steven Bancroft, who was evidently the chief pilot on that trip, dated September 30, 1940.

[Reply]

Julia Badham Reply:

Hi Kim-

I just looked through all the signatures and don’t find either Bill Grace or Steven Bancroft. If you like, I will send you the names of these men. I can read most of their signatures clearly.

Julia

Alan Wilson Reply:

I wonder if your dad knew my dad, who was also a navigator on the China Clipper. His name was Don Wilson and he passed away in 2008.

[Reply]

Julia Badham Reply:

Hi- I’m sure he must have known your father. I have a large b/w photo of the Clipper lifting off in SF that is signed by a number of navigators. There is a signature for Donald M. Wilson among the others. This may be your dad. Sorry about your loss, they were remarkable men, all of them.

[Reply]

Alan Wilson Reply:

Oh my gosh! Yep, that’s my dad’s signature. Do you know much about the photo, i.e., when it was taken and which Clipper it was? Also, is there any chance I could get a hold of a reproduction of the photo? Did your dad attend the Pan Am navigator conventions? I’m trying to get more information about my dad’s service on the Clipper and regret no end that I didn’t ask him many many more questions about it. Thanks! Sorry for all of the questions – I’m just excited to make this connection.

[Reply]

Julia Badham Reply:

I can have a photocopy made of both sides of this photo and send them to you. After a little detective work, I think I have determined that almost all the navigators signed this. Possibly some other crew members did as well. And, yes, my Dad did attend navigators conventions and get togethers over the years. His very good friend up until the last few years when he passed away was John deKramer also a navigator. Send my your address and I will post this to you.

Alison Gagliardi January 17, 2012 at 1:11 pm

My father was flown home from active duty in the Pacific in WWII on the Dixie Clipper. He has written about his experience in his memoir which I’m editing and publishing for our family. He describes all of the different interior spaces on the plane and tells about going out into the wing with an engineer to help replace an oil pump. The photos on this website concur with his descriptions, and I’d love to include some of them in this limited edition publication if it is possible. Does anyone know how I can get copies of the illustrations and permission to us them?

[Reply]

Richard Murdoch Reply:

Hello,
I hope you have had some response to your query.

Is there any chance you will publish your father’s memoir, or print some extra copies to sell?

I know there are others like me who would appreciate being able to read it, in any format.

Sincerely,
Richard Murdoch

[Reply]

cvcash December 29, 2011 at 11:46 pm

Ken Follet wrote “Night over Water” in pre-WWII days. The setting is aboard a Boeing B-314, a Super-Clipper. It is good read. It b rings the old flying boat to life.

[Reply]

Don Chaney December 27, 2011 at 6:04 pm

I was looking at Clipper on the Internet and found a reference to answer your question, although the date does not match. The link is:
http://www.clipperflyingboats.com/pan-am-planes/china-clipper
Here is the text:

The China Clipper continued to fly the Pacific for the next eight years, until she was transferred to Florida in June, 1943 to begin service on the less glamorous route between Miami and Leopoldville in the Belgian Congo.

On the evening of January 8, 1945, the China Clipper stuck an object in the water and sank at Port of Spain in Trinidad; the crash killed 14 of the 18 passengers, and 9 of the 12 members of the crew.

[Reply]

Paul Schwarz December 4, 2011 at 9:47 am

Are there any of these B314’s in exsistence ?

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AZAD December 3, 2011 at 6:18 pm

Is there any chance to find some films or video on Boeing Clippers and other flying Boats???

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jane monaghan Reply:

Static display of the Yankee clipper (without its incredible wings) is in Shannon Irelancd (Foynes) Pan American Museum. The museum is a must-visit if you’re a Pan Am fan (the reall Pan Am) Want to go back again and again. (My dad flew for Pan Am from 1940’s to the 70’s).

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Deborah Crooks October 29, 2011 at 5:56 pm

I have since found out the clipper that went down off the coast of Trinidad was on January 8, 1945. Anyone knowing anything about this crash, please contact me at crooksyd@rogers.com.

Thank you!

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Deborah Crooks October 28, 2011 at 8:48 pm

I heard tonight that my father saved people from drowning when a PanAm “sea plane” went down just off the coast of Trinidad in the West Indies. I believe it was either in 1939 or 1940 – he was told not to give any interviews but he was the “one” that disobeyed higher orders when he told the Americans that the plane had “downed” just behind an island off the main land. They did not believe him so he pushed his “boss” off a boat & took that boat to where the plane had crashed & saved some people. My father died many years ago, my family & I would love to get in touch with anyone that would remember this incident. I can be reached at crooksyd@rogers.com (Toronto, Canada)

Thank you!

[Reply]

Patrick Buss September 26, 2011 at 2:59 pm

Seattle, Wa. news story concerning the proposed raising of a Clipper.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2016319373_clipper26m.html

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