Edwin Musick

Pan Am Captain Edwin Musick

Pan Am Captain Edwin Musick

Edwin Musick won international fame as the captain of the China Clipper on its first scheduled crossing of the Pacific in November, 1935.

The first pilot hired by Pan American Airways, and the airline’s chief pilot, Musick was involved in every aspect of Pan Am’s flight operations.  Musick flew every new aircraft and route pioneered by the airline from 1927 until his death at the controls of the Samoan Clipper in January, 1938.

Known as “Meticulous Musick” for the precision he demanded from himself and his crews, in everything from the setting of aircraft instruments to the shine on their shoes and the crease in their trousers, Musick was famous for his cautious and conservative approach to flight operations.

Early Life and Introduction to Aviation

Ed Musick was born in St. Louis in 1894 but moved to California when he was nine years old and grew up in Los Angeles, where he attended, but never finished, high school.

Musick was first exposed to aviation when he was just 15 years old, when he attended the International Air Meet held at Dominguez Field, Los Angeles in January, 1910, the first airshow ever held in the United States.  Within the next three years, Musick and two friends were building primitive airplanes of their own, and in 1913 Musick learned to fly in a single-seat Curtiss pusher plane at the Schiller Flying School.

Musick worked as a racing car mechanic, and as an aircraft mechanic at airshows in California and also at Glenn Martin’s airplane factory in Los Angeles.  Even as a young mechanic, Musick was called “the jeweler” by airshow pilots for the unusual attention he paid to every part of a plane’s equipment.

Musick toured the west coast as an airshow pilot himself from 1915 to 1917, sometimes billed as “Daredevil Musick” and sometimes performing under the persona of “Monseer Musick, the famous French Flier.”

Musick worked as a civilian flight instructor for the Army as America prepared for World War I, and after receiving a commission as an officer in the United States Marine Corps he became a naval flight instructor in Miami, Florida.

When Musick was discharged from the Marine Corps in 1919 he joined Aeromarine Airways, where he flew F5L (Model 75) flying boats, mainly in passenger between Florida and Havana, and occasionally on publicity flights around other areas of the United States.

Musick (on dock, to right) as a pilot for Aeromarine

Musick (on dock, to right) as a pilot for Aeromarine

When Aeromarine went out of buiness in 1924, Musick bought a Curtiss HS-2L flying boat and barnstormed in Miami and Long Island, New York, but made more money flying illegal liquor, banned under Prohibition, from supply boats in international waters to to bootleggers on the east coast.

On August 14, 1924 he eloped with Cleo Livingston.

Musick and Pan American

Musick’s path to Pan Am began in 1926, when he was hired as a pilot by Andre Priester, who was working as operations manager for a small airline called Philadelphia Rapid Transit Airline, which flew Fokker trimotors between Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., and eventually Norfolk, Virginia.  When Priester was recruited by Juan Trippe to join Pan American Airways in 1927, Musick followed him to the new airline as Pan Am’s Pilot Number 1 on October 19, 1927.

Within less than a week of being hired, Musick and another pilot were at the controls Pan American’s first scheduled flight, from Key West, Florida to Havana, Cuba, on October 28, 1927.

Musick was involved in all Pan American’s key operations from that point forward.  Musick flight-tested the first Sikorsky S-38 flying boat purchased by Pan Am in 1928, and he flew the S-38 on scheduled service between Florida, Cuba, Nassau, Puerto Rico, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic.

In 1929 piloted a flight with Juan Trippe and Charles Lindbergh to Dutch Guiana to innaugurate FAM 6 (Foreign Air Mail Route #6) using a Fokker Teimotor and a Sikorsky S-38. Musick also tested the first S-40, which he also flew on the first flights from Miami to Baranquilla, Colombia in 1931.

Musick was also at the controls of the brand new Sikorsky S-42 for its record-breaking test flight on August 1, 1934, and he flew an S-42 on endurance trials in Caribbean in February, 1935, flying continuous circuits between Miami and the Virgin Islands to simulate the distance between San Francisco and Honolulu.  In April 17, 1935, Musick flew the stripped down S-42 Pan American Clipper on the first survey flight from San Francisco to Honolulu, which carried the first airmail ever flown across the Pacific on its return to San Francisco.  Survey flights continued throughout 1935, and by October Musick and his crew had crossed the Pacific all the way to Guam.

Captain Musick arriving in Honolulu aboard Sikorsky S-42 after first Pacific survey flight. April, 1935.

Captain Musick arriving in Honolulu aboard Sikorsky S-42 after first Pacific survey flight. April, 1935.

Although the S-42 was useful for survey flights, with its passenger accommodations ripped out and replaced with auxiliary fuel tanks, the Sikorsky was not capable of trans-Pacific flights with passengers, and by late 1935 Musick was test flying Pan Am’s newest clipper, the Martin M-130.  Within just a few weeks of its first flight, the M-130 China Clipper, with Musick in command, made the first mail flight across the Pacific ocean in November, 1935.  The pioneering transpacific flight brought international fame to the shy Musick, who appeared on the cover of Time Magazine and was awarded the 1935 Harmon Trophy for his achievement.

Captain Musick was known for his shy, quiet personality, and he disliked the publicity that was thrust upon him.  As Time Magazine described him:

He refuses to show off or make wisecracks for newsmen. He has never been known to stunt in a plane, never makes a flight without the most meticulous preparations, even refuses to tie up to a mark until it has been tested. Completely lacking in vanity, he refuses to discuss his career even with such close friends as Navigator Noonan, with whom he bunks when on duty.

He lives quietly with his blonde wife, Cleo, has no children, likes baseball, Buicks, apples, ham & cheese sandwiches, vacations in Manhattan.

His face, almost wooden, sometimes lights up in a crooked smile. Prone to swearing a good deal in a quiet, pleasant way, he never loses his temper, though he is a martinet about detail. When he is in command, his ship must be spotless, his men equally neat.

Musick hated the public appearances pressed on him by an Pan American publicity director William Van Dusen, who even pressured Musick to shave with various different types of razors to eliminate the almost permanent 5-o’clock shadow that showed through in press photographs.  Van Dusen was torn between trying to get Musick to cooperate with his efforts, or simply presenting him like the strong, silent type that he was.  When Musick was preparing to depart on China Clipper’s historic flight across the Pacific, Van Dusen is supposed to have asked Musick to send some comments over the radio tha would make good copy for the newspapers.  Musick protested that he wouldn’t know what to say, so Van Dusen suggested that he say something about the sunset over the Pacific, and Musick agreed.  Several hours later, over the Pacific ocean, Musick radioed back:  “Sunset, o639 hours.”

“Meticulous Musick’s” most noted characteristic was his reputation for checking and double-checking every aspect of a flight, and his willingness to turn back or abort a flight in the interest of safety if things did not seem right.  When he encountered a thick fog near Rio de Janeiro during the inaugural flight of the Brazilian Clipper, for example, Musick delayed his arrival by a day rather than risk landing as scheduled, despite having Juan Trippe and a planeload of journalists in the plane, and a crowd of notables waiting on the dock, including the wife of the Brazilian president who was waiting to christen the plane.

The Crash of the Samoan Clipper and the Death of Captain Musick

In January, 1938, Captain Musick was again pioneering a new route for Pan American, this time to New Zealand via American Samoa.  In command of the S-42 previously known as the Pan American Clipper II, now renamed Samoan Clipper in honor of its new route, Musick and a crew of six left
Honolulu for the first scheduled airmail flight to Auckland.  After an overnight stop at Pago Pago, Musick departed for New Zealand in the early morning of January 11.  Shortly after departure, the clipper suffered an oil leak and radioed its decision to dump fuel and return to Pago Pago.

The dangers of dumping fuel in the S-42 were well known from previous experiences; fuel leaving from the drains at the back of the wing tended to flow back over the wing, toward the engines, and it was also believed that gasoline fumes could build up inside the thick wing itself.

Shortly after reporting their intention to dump fuel and return to Pago Pago, Musick and the crew of the Samoan Clipper were killed in a tremendous explosion that was seen for many miles.

Musick’s decision to dump fuel was, perhaps, an unusual decision for a pilot renowned for his caution.  While landing at Pago Pago’s small and dangerous harbor would have been dangerous with the heavy weight of a full load of fuel, Musick could have circled the island while the clipper burned enough gasoline to make a safer landing.  It is likely, of course, that Musick had a reason to avoid the many hours in the air which would have been required to lighten the plane; unfortuately, we will never know.

{ 22 comments… read them below or add one }

Brian Lofts October 2, 2012 at 6:34 pm

Cheers yet again in your case

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Jon Krupnick September 19, 2012 at 10:04 pm

Maybe I missed it –but I did not see a mention of my 700 page book–Pan Am’s Pacific Pioneers-The Rest of the Story
w/ Foreward by Jimmy Buffett–much of what is talked about here is recounted in my book w/ lots of photos–ck reviews on Amazon–regular edition has been sold out for 5 years–I still have abt 50 of the limited edition–slip case-leather bound -signed and #rd 1-250 w/ certificate for Pan Am poster worth up to $60–originally priced at $250(you will see used book dealers listing at $1000 for the limited–reduced to $150–covers in complete detail the Pan Am Flying boat era in Pacific April 1935-April 1946–
I am looking for a picture of the Musick lighthouse on Canton when the Bronze marker light was still in place–probably taken 1938 to 1941–I’d appreciate a copy–also buying any mail or photos of Pan Ams time on Canton 1938 to Dec 1941–thanks

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James McMillan Reply:

Hi,
Saw your Sept 2012 note about still having some copies of the special edition of you book at clipperflyingboats.com–are there still any remaining?

Thanks,

Jim

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Jon Krupnick Reply:

I am in Boulder for summer–yes my leatherbound–#erd and signed in slip case–I have a few left–send $150+ $15 priority mail for book-comes w/ certificate for poster ($15 handling)ordered from San Francisco Airport Museum–book orig sold for $250
JK
549 Arapahoe Ave
Boulder CO 80302

tell me how you want it signed

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Philip September 17, 2012 at 4:13 pm

I have a very intament Picture of the Captain and his children. Its isncired with a couple of notes about the child on his lap, and inside it reads “When the cabin is burned and all is spent,Come live in my heart, and pay no rent.” Is there any genealogy on Captain Musick? Also I will share Photos of if you would like. I dont see any attachment option.

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Richards Lyon March 20, 2012 at 1:12 am

l also, shook hands with Lindbergh when he stopped at the Oakland Airport. The sad part is that my uncle, one of the first to fly off a carrier, the Langley, converted from a collier, was later Naval Commander of Oakland Airport, which he claimed had the finest runways and weather conditions in America-thus the heralded take-offs that included the Dole contestants in open cockpits, some lost in the Pacific on the way to Honolulu. But San Francisco won the game

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Richards Lyon Reply:

I somehow didn’t add that we boys were at the Oakland Airport and shook Musik’s and Noonan’s hands as they took off on their maiden flight to Honolulu. I then went home to make another balsa and rice-paper model plane, believing I would fly too. I ended up in the heavens as a physician, always flying with Pan Am, whose veteran pilots were one of a kind.

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Charles Watkins February 25, 2012 at 5:02 pm

Greetings, I don’t want to be hasty, but I may have film footage of the crash sight and wreckage that was shot by another test pilot who was with Pan-Am. In his early footage he appears to be flying an early model amphibious air craft and starts his flight from Miami. His many iteneraries indicate Havana, San Juan, Haiti, Santa Dimingo, and others which I can’t recall at present. He indicates a rendezvous with Charles Lindbergh at a remote air field on an Island (can’t recall the name?) One of the later film cans mention a crash.

I’m a free lance film conservator and I am having to examine and recover the footage with a delicate pace. The film box was apparently stored in an outside storage environment for decades and each exhibit some degree of brakdown in their acetate layers. Fortunately most of his footage is di-acetate, and the weakest areas thus far are in the captions which were made on a cheaper film stock. I’m having to do emulsion lifts with them and transfer them on mylar support for scanning. I just got these a month ago and still on the first reel. I have some scans of the amphibious air craft and will have to do this from my desktop.

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Doug Miller Reply:

Charles:
I’m the web administrator for http://www.panam.org, the website of the Pan Am Historical Foundation, as well as a filmmaker.

I’d very much like to talk with you about your film. I’ve also got some very old PA film, one of which is 16mm print of a promotional film of a 1928 flight from Miami to Havana in a Fokker F-10. I have been collecting motion pictures related to Pan Am on various formats for some time, for use in a documentary film, which seems now to be much closer to fruition, given a recent production grant. I’ve been tracking film and film collections related to Pan American for many years, and perhaps it would be of real help to both of us to communicate further.

Your conservation work sounds like it extremely difficult and pains-taking!

Thanks very much,
Doug Miller

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Charles Watkins Reply:

Greetings Doug, Thanks for the reply. I think I’ve surmised the identity of the PAA piliot whom shot these films. I believe he was the pilot that flew the craft which I mentioned earlier as being in a “crash film”. The craft was NC-8020, a model B Swardorski S-32, to which records indicate no fatalities. Much of his footage appears to have been shot before this period and includes footage of the Foker 10.

If you could, please email me directly at cwatgo@gmail.com

Regards-Charles

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Charles Watkins Reply:

Please excuse the typo with my “predictive text” from my mobile device. “Sikorski” not “Swardorski”….(blasted little crystal Rhine stones…lol)

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Philip Reply:

I have something you might find interesting from the laconic Captain Musick. Its a card with a page for inscription and a old well taken photo of Edwin and two of his children.

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Doug Reply:

Sept. 18th
Hi Philip:
Very interested to know more about your card showing Capt. Musick! Please feel free to email me at panamweb@gmail.com.

Thanks!

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Chris January 13, 2012 at 12:02 pm

Hello all,

I am a documentary film maker (and a former flight attendant with Pan Am). My dad, now passed away, is buried at Arlington. He was stationed in Pago Pago during the years of the 1930’s. I am putting together a documentary film about those early years and I would love to have anything that can be passed along, including copies of personal photos from that era on the island, old Samoan and Pago Pago postcards, copies of letters that mention life on the island amongst the men stationed there, any accounts by the servicemen about the local native life, and audio tapes that may have been recorded of the stories of the old timers that can be shared. Donations of any and all types of these items would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

Best regards~

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Philip Reply:

I have something of interest. A private portrait taken long ago, well preserved, of the Captain and his children, with some inscription. Its in kind of a card form.

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M. George Puziak January 10, 2012 at 3:14 pm

When I won my first flying certification in 1983, the flying test was adminstered over the sugarcane fields west of Oahu and Ford Island by an FAA inspector named Musik. I wonder if he was related to PAN AM’s Captain Musik.

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David Ray January 2, 2012 at 11:13 am

This sounds like a great book and I hope to find a copy. My best friend of 45 years was the grand/great nephew of Captain Musick. His name is Richard Morgan Musick III of Norfolk Va. He was a champion wrestler and a Marine helicopter pilot before starting his own Fixed Base Operation (Mercury Aviation) in Chesapeake, Va. I served with him in Vietnam in 1969. Richard – known as “Moose” for his wrestling prowess (undefeated) in the 120 pound weight class, passed away in 2010. His last flights – weeks before his passing – were to help the earthquake victims in Haiti. I miss him greatly and fondly remember his stories about his Uncle Ed. When I went for my Pan Am interview he told me to mention his uncle. I was hired two days later. Thank you Captain Musick. And thank you to his nephew for the many years of friendship, loyalty, and camaraderie. Semper fi Moose.

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Philip Reply:

I have a piece of Captain Musick’s property. A fatastic picture, with inscription. Email me for a picture of the picture!

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Tony Barbarich October 28, 2011 at 12:26 am

Could someone please let me know if Ed Musick or Music had any Croatian/Jugoslav

background.

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James rousseau September 30, 2011 at 4:18 pm

There was a monument to Captain Ed Musick on Canton Island (Kuribati) in what was The Phoenix Group.

An oil leak sufficient to end the flight would most likely force the return to Pago-Pago and an immediate landing, which could have forced the issue of fuel dumping.

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Richards Lyon August 18, 2011 at 12:36 am

I was there close to the Clipper before takeoff, in Oakland, and remember Musick and Noonan almost as a single name. Dad, in his giant Pierce Arrow, conned his way to the close-in position, as had done years before so his 3 boys could meet Lindberg and touch the Spirit of St. Louisl And I remember the open cockpit Waco’s with pilots never to be seen again as they tried to win the Dole prize. Strange how I can still see these remarkable people as I finish my 95th. year.

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Ed Brown August 13, 2011 at 4:53 pm

I lived in Samoa with my parents (my father was stationed there in the Navy) between 1936 and 1939. Captain Musick landed in Samoa and my mother obtained a photograph of Capt. Musick and a picture of the Clipper,signed by Captain Musick and his crew. Is there any interest by anyone in having these two pictures. (No cost)

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Joan K. Gibson Reply:

I saw your post re: pictures of the crew of the Samoan Clipper. My grandfather, Jesse Alonzo Brooks, was the Flight Engineer on that plane when it exploded. Do you still have the pictures?

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CLIVE E CURTIS Reply:

DEAR SIR ,PIONEER AVIATION HAS BEEN BIG WITH ME AS AN EX PILOT, AND IT HAS LONG BEEN MY INTENTION TO CREATE A MONTAGE HONOURING HIS AMAZING WORK.
MAY GOD BLESS YOU AND YOURS AT THIS BLESSED CHRISTMAS TIME.
I REMAIN, YACHTSMAN .WORLD WIDE RADIO OPERATOR ,PILOT AND PREACHER OF THE GOSPEL OF JESUS CHRIST.
CLIVE E CURTIS AUCKLAND NZ.

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Philip Reply:

I have a very old photo book with Captain Musick holding one of two children. Some notes inscribed. Signed on the front.

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Ken Jensen Reply:

Ed, I am a big fan of the M-130 and the very interesting history of Pan Am. if those photos are still available I would be honored to have them.

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ELLIE Reply:

Yes, I am very interested in the photographs you have. Please email me at your earliest convenience.
Thank You!!
Ellie

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Tony Dunn Reply:

Hi Richard

I wouild LOVE these photos if you still have them to go with the flight covers I have of the Samoan Clipper. But I suppose they have noew gone?

Thanks

Tony

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Christina Reply:

Hello Ed,

I am a documentary film maker and my dad (now passed away) was also stationed in Pago Pago during those same years. I am putting together a film about those early years and I would love to have anything that you can pass along that can be added. Please let me know. My email is included in this submission.

Best regards ~

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David Dorsey Reply:

I presume these photos are gone. If not I would be interested. Thanks Dave

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Craig Gleason Reply:

Hello Ed,
My grandfather was John Maclean the navigator with Capt. Musick. I sure would like a copy of the pictures. My mother, still alive @ 80 years old, was devastated when her father died. I think she would love a picture with his signature.
Craig Gleason
Atlanta, GA

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Craig Gleason Reply:

BTY, my email is craigemail@bellsouth.net http://www.guitarplayerguy.com

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edna f brown December 31, 2010 at 4:52 am

from crate to clipper with captain musick is a great book………..

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Stanton Wyman December 28, 2010 at 2:30 am

I am fascinated to read all these notes everyone is sending back and forth regarding Pan Am flights with Ed Musick. Sorry guys. I don’t have any new info for you. I do, however collect old Pan Am 1930s stuff. I became interested in it when I talked with an old friend of mine, Capt. Kenneth V. Beer. He was the 26th pilot hired by PAA in 1928. Ed Musick checked him out in an S-38 when he joined the company. Believe it or not, I used to play tennis with Ken when he was at the grand age of 99 years. A true American pioneer and the nicest man I ever interviewed.
I’m an airline pilot for skywest airlines and I always tell my passengers about PAA as we fly in over the SF bay area (treasure island and Alameda). My headphone bag is a vintage 40s PAA blue bag.
Anyways, I have wasted enough of your time. I hope to read more correspondences soon.
Stanton Wyman

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Philip Reply:

Have you ever heard of Edwin Musick? Looking for genealogy, Please disregard if you cant help. I have a picture of him with his children. One at 17 months . Thank You!

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douglas kneubuhl October 27, 2010 at 1:50 am

My grandfather came to American Samoa in the early 1900. He married, raised a family and started numerious business. BFK inc were general sevice agents for Pan American, TEAL, and Matson to name a few. I would like to obtain the accident report from the PAA flight on January 11, 1938.
Any assistance or suggestions would be greatly appreciated

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douglas kneubuhl October 27, 2010 at 1:42 am

My grandfather was the GSA for both PAA and Matson in american Samoa. I wish to find the original accident report on the Pan Am clipper accident January 11,1938. Any guidance would be greatly appreciated

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Sam Gillie July 20, 2010 at 7:14 pm

Mr. Barrett, I have a five page narrative, by Edward Brier, who was a passenger on the Honolulu to Manila flight Leaving Honolulu October 23, 1936 and returning Nov 2nd, 1936. Don’t know if this was the inaugural passenger flight, but was so described in the narrative. The narrative was given to the Engineering Association of Hawaii in 1936. The Captain Musick (as spelled in the narrative) and Navigator Noonan were part of the crew. Edward Brier was the Chief Engineer for the Hawaiian Dredging Company.

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Douglas Westfall July 16, 2010 at 7:44 pm

I’m putting together a book on the memoirs of a Pan Am First Radio Officer.Trying to include all the planes, but cannot find anything on the S-42 that crashed at Trinidad in 1938. Not named, it was only a few months old. NC-824M.

Would appreciate anyone who has information on that aircraft incident.

Best Always, Douglas

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Brian Westfall Reply:

Hi Douglas,

I have started researching the early clipper radio equipment. I saw your post. Have you located anything about the Pan AM Supply Co. radios that were built in Miami? I’m glad another Westfall is interested in the clippers.

Brian

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Meg Dondero Reply:

Hi Brian,
Just read your Aug. 2011 message re researching early clipper radio equipment. My father, Ralph Conly, was a FRO for PAA (1940-1950). I recently donated some of his things to the SFO Museum, incl. old PAA radio equip., some manuals (PAA Radio training school, Ground training section, Latin American Division (1943); CDF receiver theory of operation manuals (1941); Model CDF aircraft radio rcvr. instructions (1944); etc.), and even some navigational charts (c.1938-1948). If you’re able to get to the SFO Air Museum, you’d probably find a lot of info. there. (Dad helped w/the restoration of the equip. for the B307 (2001 & 2003), which is now at the Smithsonian at Dulles Airport.) =) He also kept an up-to-date mail list/newsletter of PAA FRO’s, until 2007 (he died in 2010) — Perhaps you’d like a copy of the last couple of those, which could put you in touch w/retired FRO’s, who could help you w/your research. (?) (Dad always intended to ‘write a book’ someday, so I’ve still got a Lot of files/papers to go thru, including letters from other ex-PAA FRO’s, and I’ve got 2-3 video interviews of some retired FRO’s, including Hugo Leuteritz, which may interest you?) If you email me, please be patient, as I don’t check it often, but I’ll try to keep up with it! lol ;) Best regards, Meg D.

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Brian Westfall Reply:

Thanks for the info. How can I see the videos? I will make a trip to SFO and check with the library.

Brian

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Meg Dondero Reply:

Contact me directly, @ nutmeg13@myfam.com, so we can exchange phone #’s. If you’re seriously interested in the interviews Dad did, I’ll find them. (I’ve seen the Hugo Leuteritz one, but it’s been a while…(Do you know who he is? From what Dad told me, he’s the ‘father’ of radio communication, at least as far as PAA/flying goes, and he knew/worked with Juan Trippe). I haven’t seen the other interviews, but read in my Dad’s notes that he’s got a couple others. It’ll take me a little time to find them in the boxes I have of Dad’s stuff. ;) I can make you a DVD, if I can get a working camcorder…(Mine *just* stopped working, so I’ll have to find another one, somewhere)…or I can find a service that can transfer the recordings for me.)

Looking forward to talking with you. (Do you live in California, or…?)

Ttys,
Meg

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Robert E Dahlstrom May 17, 2010 at 4:55 pm

Just a bit of history. My uncle Ralph Dahlstrom captain of the Hawaii Clipper, Musick was in another plane 150 miles back and Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan were following. This was the first time 3 airplanes were over the Pacific in one night. The date I think is 17 March 1937. I’d be interested in any information on Ralph Dahlstrom.

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Randy Perl Reply:

I found out about Ralph from his daughter, Gerry Martz, who I just spoke to today.

(352) 481- 0553

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Ron Barrett, USAF Ret. Navigator January 17, 2010 at 4:42 pm

Dear Craig Gleason, Good to hear from you. Can you tell me what you know of the nav skills, training and or exploits of either your Grandfather John Maclean and Musik. We desire as to learn what these individuals thought of their work at that time. Do you have any pictures you could share with us all?

I am just back from a history research trip to Key West where I located Charles Lunn’s youth time home and the first offices of Pan Am (now Kelly’s Restaurant). Thanks, Ron Barrett, President Air Force Navigators Observers Association (www.afnoa.org)

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Craig Gleason Reply:

I have a video of a clipper ship and my grandfather John Maclean http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SiYJEnLvKOk

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Ronald P Barrett, USAF Ret Nav. November 20, 2009 at 12:10 pm

I would like to hear from anyone knowing anything, having correspondence, pictures, news articles or stories about the relationship of Pan Am Captain Musik (Musick;spelling?) and Navigator Frederick Noonan. What all were the French, British(always seemingly headed to Australia), Germany(who had done dirigibles much earlier to South America), Portuguese(heading down to Brazil) and Dutch doing at this time?

As a former trans-Pacific transport (C-124) navigator for the USAF I navigated some 3,000 oceanic hours, world wide. I am researching the historical foundations of oceanic flight operations as they depended so heavily on successful navigation.

Your help is appreciated. Thank you, Ron Barrett, President, Air Force Navigators Observers Association (Reference: http://www.afnoa.org and http://www.usaf-nav-history.com ) Nov 20, 2009

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Craig Gleason Reply:

Hello Ronald,
My grandfather John Maclean was the navigator on the Samoan Clipper with Musik when they were lost. My grandmother told me stories about Fred Noonan and my grandfather being friends.

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Roland Musick Reply:

Hello Mr Barrett, The spelling Musick is correct. I have a genealogy book of the Musick family and have seen him here. I will see what I can find for you.
Best regards Roland

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Steve Musick Reply:

Hello Roland, I would be interested in what book it is that you have related to Musick genealogy. Am always looking for new information related to the family.

Steve Edlin Musick

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Roland Musick Reply:

Hi Steven, The book I have was published in 1964, its the genealogy of the Musick family and some kindred lines, written by my Grandfather. I looked through it and found some Steven’s but didnt find your name. If you were born after 1964 email me back with one your parents names and I will see if I can find them. Roland

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Steve Musick Reply:

It’s Steve not Steven, my mother didn’t like the name Steven or Stephen, (smile) but I have lived with it sense 1943 (Topeka, Kansas) now. My Fathers name was Elmer Edward Musick (Waco,Texas) and my grandfather was Clifford Henry Musick (Topeka, Kansas).

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Aline Musick Reply:

Hello!
I am also interested in that genealogy book because I am a Musick too and I live in Mexico!!
I have searched on internet for more Musick family to know more about my roots, but I have not find much information.
I hope you can share some information about Musicks with me and help me to know more about that amaizing last name that we share.

Thanks a lot.

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Steve Musick Reply:

Have you tried MusickFamily.com That should get you to Musick Family Association of America. There is many different people involved in the site, and should be able to help you.

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Philip Reply:

I have a very intiment Picture of the Captain and his children. Its inscribed with a couple of notes about the child on his lap, and inside it reads “When the cabin is burned and all is spent,Come live in my heart, and pay no rent.” Is there any genealogy on Captain Musick? Also I will share Photos of if you would like. I dont see any attachment option.

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Roland Musick Reply:

Hi Aline, For some reason I do not get emails from this site, I just came across this listing now. Steve gave a name to a website called MusickFamily.com. Early Researcher Grover Musick was my grandfather. I have his book, which is from 1964, at home with many names in it. If you send me your mother, father or grandparents name I can see if I can find them in the index for you and give you a history.

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Philip Reply:

Have you ever heard of Edwin Musick? Looking for genealogy, Please disregard if you cant help. Thank You! I believe I have A personal picture of him and his 17 month child with another child in the back.

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Glen Osterhout Reply:

Hi Ronald,
You may have known my father. Merwin William Osterhout, Bill Osterhout. He was the Navigator on the Yankee Clippers final flight. If you know anything about him, I would love to hear about it. He was a great man who taught me to fly, and I still do, however, just Cessna 150’s. He told some modest stories of how he was involved in flying Roosevelt to the Yalta summit, worked for the CIA during the Bay of Pigs in case evacuations were necessary, and how he helped Jane Fromen from the wreckage of the Yankee Clipper. My mother says that he saved her life. Anyway, I would love to hear anything about him. I found a picture that I believe is him Navigating on a B314.
My e-mail is gosterho@yahoo.com
I would love to hear anything about him.
Glen Osterhout

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Clipper Maxfield September 8, 2009 at 7:27 pm

Thank you for writings. I now know how Captain Musik died. This I will note in “my history.” I am very glad though, that he made it safely to NZ a year earlier.

Clipper

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